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Colloquium - Sicker

Cooperation in Software Defined Radio Networks
Department of Computer Science
10/20/2005
3:30pm-4:30pm

Advances in computing technology change the context of public policy. Sometimes this change is beneficial, such as when it introduces competition or innovation. Other times it creates significant social welfare disruptions, such as when it fails to account for public safety needs. Computer scientists and engineers can contribute to good policy and technology outcomes by illuminating the effects of technological advance on policy and by developing particular technical solutions that effectively address current and future social goals.

For the last three years my research has focused on this intersection of technology and policy. My specific focus is on incorporating policy mechanisms into network technology. This has included various projects within the space of computer security and VoIP technology. My more recent research has focused on the development of agile radio networks. The overall goal of this work is to allow radio devices to assess the availability of radio frequencies and optimize the dynamic access to unused spectrum. Such dynamic access to spectrum together with software driven device reconfiguration promises tremendous gains in available bandwidth. The development of this technology exposes a host of interesting topology, architecture and spectrum usage problems.

In this talk, I will discuss my work on cooperative and non-cooperative protocols for improving the operation of radio devices within unlicensed spectrum. Initial findings demonstrate that even simple non-cooperative sharing techniques can offer an order of magnitude increase in available spectrum. In extending this work, I plan to determine how cooperative protocols might further enhance available spectrum. In this talk, I will begin by describing what makes spectrum sharing hard, then present my initial finding and discuss future research directions.

Department of Computer Science
University of Colorado Boulder
Boulder, CO 80309-0430 USA
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www.cs.colorado.edu
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