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Colloquium - Martin, Wolf and Zorn

Faculty Research Talks
Department of Computer Science
Department of Computer Science
Department of Computer Science
9/11/1997
3:45pm-4:45pm
Professor Martin -- Research in Computational Linguistics at CU

In this talk, I will give a brief overview of our past and current research on getting computers to do interesting and useful things involving human language. Some of the topics that will be covered include machine translation, speech recognition, computational modeling of human language abilities, and information retrieval (including tidbits about what really happens inside various Web search engines). I will also describe some related activities going on in other departments at CU.

Professor Wolf -- SERL: The Software Engineering Research Laboratory

Software has become the driving force behind most new technologies. But the engineering of software is becoming increasingly complicated. A software engineer must balance a variety of competing factors, including functionality, performance, safety, usability, time to market, and cost. Moreover, the size of software systems that are being built is rapidly growing.

The Software Engineering Research Laboratory (SERL) is pursuing the discovery of principles and the development of technologies to support the engineering of large, complex software systems. The challenging target for this work are organizations and software systems operating in the wide-area, heterogeneous, distributed, and decentralized context of the Internet. Broadly speaking, there are four themes that underlie the research: software architecture, configuration management, distributed object technology, and software process. This talk reviews ongoing projects in these areas, highlighting several recently developed prototypes.

Professor Zorn -- Empirical Research Program at the University of Colorado

In this talk, I will discuss my diverse research program which is based around an experimental approach to understanding and improving the behavior of computer systems. Many of my projects share a common theme of collecting empirical measurements about the behavior of complex software systems, and developing algorithms to exploit that behavior. I will briefly describe several of my current projects, which include storage management and garbage collection, program behavior prediction for optimization, and storage management in persistent object systems.

Refreshments will be served immediately before the talk at 3:30pm.
Hosted by BACTAC.

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